Somatic Psychotherapy

Somatics relies on the wisdom of the body as a powerful vehicle for healing past traumas, growing personal resilience and supporting our movement into the world.

Through our bodies, we experience sensations, intuitions, thoughts, feelings, and the continuity of the life force. Our bodies hold the shape of all of our experiences. This gives us resources and strength, but it also creates our limitations and challenges. The body creates patterns from early experiences (like fear, trauma and other upsets) that affect how we act today. By paying close attention, these old patterns are revealed, and new, more satisfying ways of moving in the world can be learned.

Accessing the body in a sensitive and compassionate way reveals information often overlooked in traditional therapy. The added awareness of sensations and felt experiences within the body deepen the work and give us access to embodied patterns of distress. This can provide a channel between the unconscious and conscious and forge a new road to self-awareness. More personal resources are revealed, and new options for living become apparent. When we gain access to the inner voice of our body’s wisdom and slow down enough to hear what our whole being is saying, we find that the answers we seek are often inside.

Somatic practices bring the mind and the body back into a collaborative relationship by gently and surely returning our awareness to that inner voice. This work helps us find sanctuary within ourselves.

What can I expect in a somatic session?

A session will follow an organic pattern that arises from the relationship between client and therapist. Some sessions will be conversations; some will include therapeutic touch; some sessions include movement exercises or experiments, role-play or meditation; some sessions take place outside as we allow nature to participate in the healing process. Expressive arts modalities, including writing, drawing and storytelling are also used. Occasionally, I teach somatic exercises to practice between sessions, or give other body-centered “homework” which can be integrated into daily living.

Comments are closed.